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Health Benefits

 

Sweet PDZ is an all-natural, non-hazardous and non-toxic mineral. It captures, neutralizes and eliminates harmful levels of ammonia and odors.  Sweet PDZ is a far superior alternative to lime products for ammonia removal and moisture absorption.


 

There are few terms in the world of the horse owner that are dreaded more than Heaves, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) now called RAO (Recurrent Airway Obstruction),  and IAD (Inflammatory Airway Disease). All of these respiratory diseases affect your equine partner’s performance and compromise their overall health.

The way most of us keep our horses and animals stalled for long periods of time during the day and/or overnight can be a significant factor in the development of these ailments.  Many of us just do not have a choice in the matter they have to be stalled; however we do have a choice in how well we care for our equine companions.

Sweet PDZ is the inexpensive solution to eliminating one of the three main causes of respiratory distress in horses - Ammonia.  By being proactive and providing your horse with fresh air to breathe in its stall you are promoting an environment conducive to health. If a horse’s respiratory tract is compromised it becomes a easy access route for bacteria, viruses, mold, parasites and other foreign elements. But you shouldn’t just take our word on it. Below are excerpts from articles that support ammonia free air.

For more information about Sweet PDZ or to find a dealer near you, call PDZ Company, LLC at (800) 367-1534
or email us.

Visit our industrial web site for information on our various zeolite minerals and their industrial applications at www.steelheadspecialtyminerals.com

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From:  Equus Caballus Spring 2007 (Article by Tracey Williams)

From:  The Horse:  Your Guide to Equine Health Magazine Feb. 2004 (Article by Michelle Anderson)

From:  Equine Wellness May/June 2007 Issue (Article by Peter Moon “Composting turns manure into gold)

From:  Western Horseman Feb. 2004 (Article by Dwight G. Bennett, D.V.M, Ph.D.)

From:  Equus March 2004 (Article by Christine Barakat)

From:  Respiratory Problems Article by Nancy S. Loving, DVM (See Health Issues File)

From:  Ammonia & Foals Don’ Mix (Report from Dr. Frederick Harper/University of TN)

From:  horse-canada.com website, November 7, 2002

 

 

From:  Equus Caballus Spring 2007 (Article by Tracey Williams)

“According to the International Veterinary Information Service, researchers M.S. Davis and W.M. Foster released a paper indicating that as little as 10 ppm for 5 to 7 weeks can cause dysfunction of the horse’s mucus membranes, which decreases immune response and makes the horse susceptible to other pathogens.”

In 2001, Michigan State University’s Equine Pulmonary Laboratory released a study, which found that stabled young horses during training suffer respiratory distress compared to young horses that are pastured during training.  The researchers reported – “We conclude that stabling is associated with inflammation of both the upper and lower airway of young horses.”

The article also reported – “Ammonia’s effects are exacerbated in foals, according to Frederick Harper, PhD and extension horse specialist for the University of Tennessee.  According to Harper, approximately 15 percent of all foals suffer a severe respiratory disease before they are one year old, although most occur between 2 to 6 months.  Since foals spend a great deal of time on or near the stall floor, ammonia exposure is heightened.


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From:  The Horse:  Your Guide to Equine Health Magazine Feb. 2004 (Article by Michelle Anderson)

Ms. Anderson’s article makes the point – “Those warm, closed barns compound the ammonia problem as the heat spurs on bacterial growth while also agitating ammonia molecules and causing the gas to rise.”

In the article, Karen Hayes, DVM, notes that ammonia is a caustic gas.  “Besides just being unpleasant in a barn, ammonia gas burns the delicate tissues of the respiratory tract and the eyes and increases mucus production.”


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From:  Equine Wellness May/June 2007 Issue (Article by Peter Moon “Composting turns manure into gold)

Per Karen Hayes, DVM quoted in Article that, “A l,l00 pound horses passes manure on average, seven to ten times per day, adding up to a total daily output of about fifty pounds.  A small operation housing only ten horses accumulates almost seven tons of manure in just one month.”


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From:  Western Horseman Feb. 2004 (Article by Dwight G. Bennett, D.V.M, Ph.D.)

IAD can be brought on by noxious gases (namely, ammonia)
IAD can progress to heaves
IAD is curable if caught and treated early on
Heaves is a permanent condition
Racehorses w/IAD often “fade at the quarter-pole”
32% of horses w/IAD ever cough and yet 85% of coughing horses have IAD
Environmental management is the most important aspect of heaves and IAD treatment.
It’s safe to say that horses kept on pasture all the time will not develop heaves
Most of the affected horses are over 5 years old
IAD recovery time is 7-22 days (that’s a lot of lost training time and $$)
Heave flare-ups can be expected for the rest of the affected horses life


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From:  Equus March 2004 (Article by Christine Barakat)

Thoroughbreds are the breed most at risk of RAO (which was formerly referred to as COPD, which is better known as Heaves); having three times a greater chance of developing RAO.  This might be a result of how these horses being kept indoors for a much greater amount of time.
RAO seems to be affected by the season of the year.  Horses were more likely to be diagnosed with RAO in the winter and spring than in the summer.  Probably due to more of them being stalled indoors in these seasons.

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From:  Respiratory Problems Article by Nancy S. Loving, DVM (See Health Issues File)

Clean air is a definite part of the recipe for tending to a horse with respiratory problems.  It is also an excellent strategy for maintaining good airway health.

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From:  Ammonia & Foals Don’ Mix (Report from Dr. Frederick Harper/University of TN)

Much ammonia is found on the floor where young foals spend a lot of time.  Young foals have a immature respiratory system, making them more susceptible to disease.
Ammonia levels as high as 400 ppm were measured in foal stalls in one study.

But, it has been reported that 10 ppm of ammonia is the level above which one might expect problems in animals.

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From:  horse-canada.com website, November 7, 2002

The source of ammonia is the horse’s urine and feces.  Ammonia inhibits the movement of the cilia in the airways, consequently affecting these defense mechanism’s ability to remove particles from the lung.  Ammonia can also increase the mucus production.  Aerial ammonia is highly soluble in water so much of it is absorbed in the upper airways.  It can also be absorbed by hygroscopic dust particles.  The ammonia can be re-released from these particles in the lung.  Ammonia levels increase dramatically when stalls are being mucked out.  If the horse is left in the stall during mucking, it will be subjected not only to high levels of ammonia, but also high levels of dust.

Bedding with high moisture content and humid air can hold ammonia.  As temperature and humidity rises, ammonia levels in barns rise as well.  While ammonia is a serious threat to respiratory health, you can easily control it by adjusting your stable management.  Ensure the stable is well ventilated, and that stall floors have good drainage, dry bedding and are mucked out at least once a day.  There are also commercial products available to help with ammonia control.


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